Posts Tagged ‘Alcohol’

So now I can drink?

March 9, 2010

The relationship between drinking alcohol and its effect on weight loss got more confusing this week.  A new study appearing in the Archives of Internal Medicine finds women who are light or moderate drinkers gain less weight over the years than non drinkers.  More specifically, those who drank over the course of the 13 year study gained an average of three pounds, while those who didn’t saw their weight go up an average of 9 pounds. 

For years, women and men have been told to stay away from beer, wine, hard liquors if they want to lose weight because alcohol is so high in calories.  A glass of wine contains about 150…have a couple with dinner and that can really add up over the years.  But this study doesn’t mean drinking doesn’t cause weight gain…all of the women in the study gained weight, it was just a difference of how much.  So what does this mean?

What the researchers basically concluded is that while alcohol is high in calories it’s not the reason the women gained weight, i.e. the extra calories are probably coming from somewhere else.  My advice?  Go ahead and have that glass of wine, but remember to balance it with your other food choices that day. 

By the way…an earlier study shows men who drink gain more weight than non drinkers (no exceptions).  Sorry guys!

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White Wine vs. White Teeth

October 21, 2009

Here’s another reason to reach for a bottle of red instead of white.

Experts say imbibing in a glass of chardonnay or pinot grigio (my fav) on a regular basis can damage your teeth.

Wine___Cheese__2

Apparently white wine is more acidic than red and erodes enamel more.

If you know you won’t be able to stay away from the whites, grab some cheese.  These same folks say eating calcium rich cheese at the same time could counter the wine’s eroding effects. (yet another reason to love cheese, yes!)

But before swearing off white for red, remember, red wine can stain teeth.

So as they say…drink responsibly!

Drinking to Your Health

September 19, 2009

It’s the weekend, which means it’s time for another study about how bad too much alcohol can be.  (They must time these releases to coincide with weekend bar hopping, right?)

Here’s the latest:  Binge drinking won’t just leave you with a bad headache the morning after, it could also leave you wide open to infections.

Swine Flu Virus

Swine Flu Virus

Experts say drinking one (or two or three) margaritas too many can mess with your immune system and prevent your body from producing the proteins essential for fighting off bacteria and viruses.

And the effect…can last at least 24 hours.

So with all the news of how bad the swine flu is going to be this season, maybe it’s worth thinking twice about knocking back those SoCo and lime shots at the bar tonight. 

 And no, the vitamin C in the lime isn’t enough to keep you from getting sick.

A Cup of Good Cheer

September 12, 2009

If your weekend plans include a night of drink here’s some health news worth celebrating. 

A new study finds people who drink alcohol regularly are more likely to hit the gym than their non-drinking buddies.  And those knocking back more than a drink or two a day may be the most active! 

According to a report in the Americawine glassn Journal of Health Promotion, heavy drinkers (46 drinks per month for women and 76 or more for men) exercised about 20 minutes more per week than non-drinkers.  Those who drank a little less per month (15-45 drinks for women, 30-75 for men) logged an extra ten minutes of exercise per week over abstainers. 

So why do researchers those who hit the bottle work out more than their sober counterparts?  One theory is that the drinkers are looking to burn off the extra alcoholic calories.  (A serving of regular beer has about 86 calories; a glass of wine 80.) 

Needless to say this study isn’t a green light to drink in excess regularly.  Experts generally recommend that women have no more than one drink per day and men no more than two.

Bottoms Up!

SOURCE: Regular Drinkers Get More Exercise: Study